Week 28 of Changing to a youthful phenotype with broccoli sprouts

Did a little math to end this 28th week of eating a clinically relevant weight of microwaved broccoli sprouts every day:

  • I changed the title of weekly updates after Week 7 as a result of A rejuvenation therapy and sulforaphane. Numbers used from its study: “Rats were injected four times on alternate days for 8 days.”
  • Study numbers in Part 2 of Rejuvenation therapy and sulforaphane: “The maximum lifespan for rats and humans were set to 3.8 years and 122.5 years, respectively.” I’m at a similar percentage of species maximum lifespan as were the study’s treated subjects.
  • A human-equivalent multiplication factor that can be applied to a rat post-development time period is 122.5 / 3.8 = 32.237. An 8-day rat treatment period ≈ 258 human days, and 258 / 7 ≈ 37 weeks.

To paraphrase the study’s lead laboratory researcher’s An environmental signaling paradigm of aging paper, aging is a programmed series of life stages. A body clock reset described there and subsequently experimentally tested changed 30 measurements to earlier life stages.

A reset may not require more than what I’ve been doing since the end of March. Maybe 28 weeks hasn’t been long enough to find out?


See the below discussion for a different point of view. I don’t think relative rates of metabolism between species would be more accurate than other measures because of individual differences among humans.

For example, contemplate this chart of 10 people from Microwave broccoli seeds to create sulforaphane. Individual sulforaphane metabolites (DTC is dithiocarbamates) peak plasma measurements ranged from 0.359 μmol to 2.032 μmol.

sulforaphane peak plasma


So we’re patient.

Eat broccoli sprouts to pivot your internal environment’s signals

Two 2020 reviews covered some aspects of a broccoli sprouts primary action – NRF2 signaling pathway activation:

“Full understanding of the properties of drug candidates rely partly on the identification, validation, and use of biomarkers to optimize clinical applications. This review focuses on results from clinical trials with four agents known to target NRF2 signaling in preclinical studies, and evaluates the successes and limitations of biomarkers focused on:

  • Expression of NRF2 target genes [AKR1, GCL, GST, HMOX1, NQO1] and others [HDAC, HSP];
  • Inflammation [COX-2, CRP, IL-1β, IL-6, IP-10, MCP-1, MIG, NF-κB, TNF-α] and oxidative stress [8-OHdG, Cys/CySS, GSH/GSSG] biomarkers;
  • Carcinogen metabolism and adduct biomarkers in unavoidably exposed populations; and
  • Targeted and untargeted metabolomics [HDL, LDL, TG].

No biomarkers excel at defining pharmacodynamic actions in this setting.

SFN [sulforaphane] seems to affect multiple downstream pathways associated with anti-inflammatory actions. NRF2 signaling may be but one pivotal pathway.

SFN is generally considered to be the most potent natural product inducer of Nrf2 signaling. Studies in which these actions are diminished or abrogated in parallel experiments in Nrf2-disrupted mice provide the strongest lines of evidence for a key role of this transcription factor in its actions.

It is equally evident that other modes of action contribute to the molecular responses to SFN in animals and humans. Such polypharmacy may well contribute to the efficacy of the agent in disease prevention and mitigation, but obfuscates the value of specific pharmacodynamic biomarkers in the clinical development and evaluation of SFN.”

https://www.mdpi.com/2076-3921/9/8/716/htm “Current Landscape of NRF2 Biomarkers in Clinical Trials”


Why do researchers still not use epigenetic clocks in sulforaphane clinical trials? Forty mentions of disease in this review, but no consideration of aging?

This was another example of how researchers – even when stuck in a paradigm they know doesn’t sufficiently explain their area (“No biomarkers excel”) – don’t investigate other associated research areas. Why not?

Here’s what Part 2 of Rejuvenation therapy and sulforaphane had to say to those stuck on biomarkers:

“While clinical biomarkers have obvious advantages (being indicative of organ dysfunction or disease), they are neither sufficiently mechanistic nor proximal to fundamental mechanisms of aging to serve as indicators of them. It has long been recognized that epigenetic changes are one of several primary hallmarks of aging.

DNA methylation epigenetic clocks capture aspects of biological age.”


The second review Epigenetic Regulation of NRF2/KEAP1 by Phytochemicals also completely whiffed on epigenetic clocks. One mention of aging in this review, but it wasn’t of:

  • Citation 104 from Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics; nor of
  • Citation 108 from the March 31, 2020, Aging journal; nor of
  • Citation 131 “Dietary epigenetics in cancer and aging.”

But epigenetic clock and aging associations were certainly in this review’s scope. For example, Citation 119 said:

“Nrf2 transcriptional activity declines with age, leading to age-related GSH loss among other losses associated with Nrf2-activated genes. This effect has implications, too, for decline in vascular function with age. Some of the age-related decline in function can be restored with Nrf2 activation by SFN.”

Why would people bother with phytochemicals (buzzword “compounds produced by plants”) unless they needed to either ameliorate symptoms or address causes?

“Epigenetic Regulation of NRF2/KEAP1 by Phytochemicals” doesn’t occur in just laboratory situations. It’s also part of daily life.

These reviewers were straight-forward with side effects for two of the first review’s four items:

“The best known NRF2 activator that has obtained clinical approval is dimethyl fumarate for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. However, it has several side effects, including allergic reactions and gastrointestinal disturbance. There are a few related agents in clinical trials, such as Bardoxolone and SFX-01, a synthetic derivative of sulforaphane, which also exhibit less than desirable outcomes.”


Treating psychopathological symptoms will somehow resolve causes?

This 2020 Swiss review subject was potential glutathione therapies for stress:

“We examine the available data supporting a role for GSH [reduced glutathione] levels and antioxidant function in the brain in relation to anxiety and stress-related psychopathologies. Several promising compounds could raise GSH levels in the brain by either increasing the availability of its precursors or the expression of GSH-regulating enzymes through activation of Nrf2.

GSH is the main cellular antioxidant found in all mammalian tissues. In the brain, GSH homeostasis has an additional level of complexity in that the expression of GSH and GSH-related enzymes are not evenly distributed across all cell types, requiring the coordination between neurons and astrocytes to neutralize oxidative insults.

Increased energy demand in situations of chronic stress leads to mitochondrial ROS overproduction, oxidative damage and exhaustion of GSH pools in the brain.

Several compounds can function as precursors of GSH by acting as cysteine (Cys) donors such as taurine or glutamate (Glu) donors such as glutamine (Gln). Other compounds stimulate the synthesis and recycling of GSH through the activation of the Nrf2 pathway including sulforaphane and melatonin. Compounds such as acetyl-L-carnitine can increase GSH levels.”

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0149763419311133 “Therapeutic potential of glutathione-enhancers in stress-related psychopathologies” (not freely available)


Many animal studies of “stress-related psychopathologies” were cited without noting applicability to humans. The reviewers instead had curious none-of-this-means-anything disclaimers like:

“Comparisons between studies investigating brain disorders of such different nature such as psychiatric disorders or neurodegenerative diseases, or even between brain or non-brain related disorders should be made with caution.”

Regardless, this paper had informative sections for my 27th week of eating broccoli sprouts every day.

1. I forgot to mention in Broccoli sprout synergies that I’ve taken 500 mg of trimethyl glycine (aka betaine) twice a day for over 15 years. Section 3.1.2 highlighted the amino acid glycine:

“Endogenous synthesis is insufficient to meet metabolic demands for most mammals (including humans) and additional glycine must be obtained from the diet. While most research has focused on increasing cysteine levels in the brain in order to drive GSH synthesis, glycine supplementation alone or in combination with cysteine-enhancing compounds are gaining attention for their ability to enhance GSH.”

2. The amino acid taurine dropped off my supplement regimen last year after taking 500 mg twice a day for years. It’s back on now after reading Section 3.1.3:

“Most studies that reported enhanced GSH in the brain following taurine treatment were performed under a chronic regimen and used in age-related disease models. Such positive effects of taurine on GSH levels may be explained by the fact that cysteine is the essential precursor to both metabolites, whereby taurine supplementation may drive the metabolism of cysteine towards GSH synthesis.

3. A study in Upgrade your brain’s switchboard with broccoli sprouts was cited for its potential:

“Thalamic GSH values significantly correlated with blood GSH levels, suggesting that peripheral GSH levels may be a marker of brain GSH content. Studies point to the capacity of sulforaphane to function both as a prophylactic against stress-induced behavioral changes and as a positive modulator in healthy animals.”


Sunrise minus 5 minutes

Increasing carbon dioxide levels increases beneficial broccoli sprout compounds

This 2020 study used IPCC unscientific, politically-motivated, wild-ass guesses for year 2100 CO2 levels to find that broccoli sprouts – like most plants – benefit when CO2 is increased:

“Elevated CO2 (eCO2, 620 ppm, the expected IPCC-SRES B2-scenario prediction of eCO2 of the year 2100) was applied for 9 days to further improve nutritive and health-promoting values of three cultivars of broccoli sprouts.

  • eCO2 improved sprouts growth and induced GLs [glucosinolates] accumulation.
  • There were increases in myrosinase activity, which stimulated GLs hydrolysis to yield health-promoting sulforaphane.
  • Low levels of sulforaphane nitrile were detected and positively correlated with reduced epithiospecifier protein after eCO2 treatment.
  • High glucoraphanin and sulforaphane levels in eCO2 treated sprouts improved the anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory properties of their extracts.

In conclusion, eCO2 treatment enriches broccoli sprouts with health-promoting metabolites and bioactivities.”

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S030881462030964X “Elevated CO2 improves glucosinolate metabolism and stimulates anticancer and anti-inflammatory properties of broccoli sprouts” (not freely available)


This study was sponsored in Saudi Arabia. Would gathering such scientific evidence even be permitted in more “enlightened” countries?

Performing research on obvious lies and thinking for yourself isn’t allowed anymore in most “learning” institutions. You already knew that, didn’t you?

At the end of How much sulforaphane is suitable for healthy people? I applauded my high-school literature teachers for forcing their students to demonstrate that they could think for themselves. I didn’t mention that each monthly assignment to read two books, then compare-and-contrast them in a 3-page handwritten paper, was individualized so that students couldn’t undo the assignment’s purpose with parasitical collaboration.

This former practice remains a good measure of intentional dumbing-down of young people, the purpose of which has become clearer.

Unraveling oxytocin – is it nature’s medicine?

This 2020 review attempted to consolidate thousands of research papers on oxytocin:

“Chemical properties of oxytocin make this molecule difficult to work with and to measure. Effects of oxytocin are context-dependent, sexually dimorphic, and altered by experience. Its relationship to a related hormone, vasopressin, have created challenges for its use as a therapeutic drug.

Widely used medical interventions i.e.:

  • Exogenous oxytocin, such as Pitocin given to facilitate labor;
  • Opioid medications that block the oxytocin system; or
  • Cesarean sections that alter exposure to endogenous oxytocin

have lasting consequences for the offspring and/or mother.

Such exposures hold the potential to have epigenetic effects on the oxytocin systems, including changes in DNA methylation. These changes in turn would have lasting effects on the expression of receptors for oxytocin, leaving individuals differentially able to respond to oxytocin and also possibly to the effects of vasopressin.

Regions with especially high levels of OXTR [oxytocin receptor gene] are:

  • Various parts of the amygdala;
  • Bed nucleus of the stria terminalis;
  • Nucleus accumbens;
  • Brainstem source nuclei for the autonomic nervous system;
  • Systems that regulate the HPA axis; as well as
  • Brainstem tissues involved in pain and social attention.

Oxytocin protects neural cells against hypoxic-ischemic conditions by:

  • Preserving mitochondrial function;
  • Reducing oxidative stress; and
  • Decreasing a chromatin protein that is released during inflammation

which can activate microglia through the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). RAGE acts as an oxytocin-binding protein facilitating the transport of oxytocin across the blood-brain barrier and through other tissues.

Directionality of this transport is 5–10 times higher from the blood to the brain, in comparison with brain to blood transport. Individual differences in RAGE could help to predict cellular access to oxytocin and might also facilitate access to oxytocin under conditions of stress or illness.

Oxytocin and vasopressin and their receptors are genetically variable, epigenetically regulated, and sensitive to stressors and diet across the lifespan. As one example, salt releases vasopressin and also oxytocin.

Nicotine is a potent regulator of vasopressin. Smoking, including prenatal exposure of a fetus, holds the potential to adjust this system with effects that likely differ between males and females and that may be transgenerational.

Relative concentrations of endogenous oxytocin and vasopressin in plasma were associated with:

These studies support the usefulness of measurements of both oxytocin and vasopressin but leave many empirical questions unresolved.

The vast majority of oxytocin in biosamples evades detection using conventional approaches to measurement.”

https://pharmrev.aspetjournals.org/content/pharmrev/72/4/829.full.pdf “Is Oxytocin Nature’s Medicine?”


I appreciated efforts to extract worthwhile oxytocin research from countless poorly performed studies, research that wasted resources, and research that actually detracted from science.

I was disappointed that at least one of the reviewers didn’t take this review as an opportunity to confess their previous wastes like three flimsy studies discussed in Using oxytocin receptor gene methylation to pursue an agenda.

Frank interpretations of one’s own study findings to acknowledge limitations is one way researchers can address items upfront that will be questioned anyway. Such analyses also indicate a goal to advance science.

Although these reviewers didn’t provide concrete answers to many questions, they highlighted promising research areas, such as:

  • Improved approaches to oxytocin measurements;
  • Prenatal epigenetic experience associations with oxytocin and OXTR; and
  • Possible transgenerational transmission of these prenatal epigenetic experiences.

Part 3 of Do broccoli sprouts treat migraines?

This 2019 Swedish review subject was the role of inflammation in migraines:

“In this article, we argue that inflammation could have an important role in migraine chronification through a mechanism termed neurogenic neuroinflammation, a phenomenon whereby activation of trigeminal sensory pathways leads to an orchestrated inflammatory response involving immune cells, vascular cells and neurons.

No studies to date have directly linked hypothalamic neuroinflammation with migraine, and we therefore looked to other studies. Overactivity of the NF-κB–IKKβ signalling pathway has been shown to be a critical modulator of hypothalamic inflammation.

We do not believe that CNS inflammation is involved in the triggering of migraine attacks, as BBB alterations, glial cell activation and leukocyte infiltration have not been observed in individuals with this condition. Peripheral sensitization is an important factor in migraine chronification, as opposed to migraine triggering.”

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41582-019-0216-y “Does inflammation have a role in migraine?” (not freely available)

See Reevaluate findings in another paradigm for other views of hypothalamic inflammation.


I came across this review through its citation in the 2020 medical paper The fifth cranial nerve in headaches with the same lead author:

“Reduced serotonergic transmission seems to be involved in medication overuse headache development, possibly through a facilitation of the sensitization process via a maladaptive plasticity. In humans, common neurophysiological investigation of central sensitization shows an abnormal cortical response to repetitive sensory stimuli, with an increased response amplitude after low numbers of stimuli and a lacking habituation, suggesting an altered plasticity.

Neurons, under repetitive, persistent nociceptive, become sensitized and produce exaggerated and prolonged responses to lower threshold stimuli. Over time, a neuroplastic adaptation in medullary and cortical pain areas causes a shift in the pain modulatory system creating a new threshold and favouring a net pain facilitation rather than pain alleviation.

Targets are almost exclusively found in the nerves of trigeminal ganglion; the hub of the fifth cranial nerve. Although we believe that the headache-trigger most likely have the origin in the CNS, this review underscores the importance of trigeminal neurons in the perception of pain.”

This second paper listed various treatments of symptoms. Remarkable for no focus on treatments of causes.


Per Parts 1 and 2, I rarely get headaches anymore, much less migraines. 23 weeks of eating a clinically relevant amount of broccoli sprouts every day resolved causes for me. I didn’t appreciate how migraines and many other things changed until awakening during Week 9.

Sleep

If you can stand the woo of two Californians trying to outwoo each other, listen to these five podcasts with a sleep scientist.

https://peterattiamd.com/matthewwalker1/

“Ambien, sedation, hypnotives, are not sleep.

Sleep is a life support system. It’s the Swiss army knife of health.

Lack of sleep is like a broken water pipe in your home that leaks down into every nook and cranny of your physiology.

Sleep research is not being transmitted to clinical practice.”


I live on the US East Coast. Hyperbole in normal conversations outside of urban centers is an exception.

It’s different on the West Coast. For example:

  • Interviewer assertions regarding heart rate variability should be compared and contrasted with Dead physiological science zombified by psychological research evidence that:

    “A broad base of further evidence was amassed within human cardiac, circulatory, and autonomic physiology such that the hypotheses do not work as described.”

  • Interviewer favorable comments for MDMA (Ecstasy) “to deal with issues of underlying trauma, anxiety, and depression.”

Eat broccoli sprouts for your skin!

This 2020 Swiss review subject was the interaction of Nrf2 activators and skin:

“The electrophile and Nrf2 activator dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an established and efficient drug for patients suffering from the common inflammatory skin disease psoriasis. DMF is being tested for pharmacological activity in several other inflammatory skin conditions.

dmf

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease affecting 2–4% of the population and plaque psoriasis is the most common type, affecting about 90% of all patients. As about 30% of all patients suffer from moderate and severe psoriasis, there is a strong need for efficient systemic treatment options with few side effects.

SFN [sulforaphane] blocks NF-κB activity by several mechanisms. SFN oxidizes IκB, thereby inhibiting its phosphorylation and downstream NF-κB activation, but also targets specific cysteine residues of p50/p65, causing a reduction in DNA binding.

More indirect effects have also been suggested. SFN induces HO-1 expression via Nrf2, which in turn inhibits NF-κB. The isothiocyanate can also react with and oxidize components of cellular redox buffers, such as glutathione and thioredoxin, which are required to retain NF-κB’s DNA-binding capacity.

NLRP3 is believed to be critically involved in common diseases, whereas its role in immunity is rather minor. The mechanisms underlying NLRP3 inflammasome activation are of high medical interest.

Electrophiles can directly inhibit inflammasome activation. SFN inhibits activation of NLRP3 in the absence of NRF2 expression in a very fast manner, suggesting that transcriptional effects are not relevant for NLRP3 inhibition. SFN inhibits NLRP3 even in KEAP1 knockout cells.

All these results demonstrate that electrophiles can inhibit the inflammasome pathway in a direct manner, perhaps via the modification of reactive cysteine residues of inflammasome proteins or those which regulate activation of these complexes.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7072181/ “Electrophiles against (Skin) Diseases: More Than Nrf2”


These reviewers focused on a pharmaceutical. Read this article for progress made on a generic:

“Biogen is expected to appeal this ruling against its Tecfidera patent protection, which is not due to expire until 2028. Its list price is reported to be about $2,026 for a two-week (14 day) supply at 120 mg.

‘The District Court decision clears the legal pathway for us to bring our dimethyl fumarate product to market, and we are working with the FDA to accelerate our regulatory approval target action date, which currently is November 16.'”


Broccoli or Sulforaphane: Is It the Source or Dose That Matters? listed 15 mouse studies and 4 human studies of sulforaphane treatments of skin diseases in Supplementary Material Table S3.

From Novel Nrf2 activators from microbial transformation products inhibit blood–retinal barrier permeability in rabbits:

“The cysteine residue of sulforaphane works as a weak electrophile and it interacts with cysteine residues of Keap1. Dimethyl fumarate is also a weak electrophile.

Nrf2 activity was evaluated by NQO1 induction activity in Hepa1c1c7 cells. RS9 was the most potent and the concentration needed to double (CD) the specific Nrf2 activity was 0.2 nM. The CD values for bardoxolone methyl, sulforaphane and dimethyl fumarate were 0.9 nM, 154.4 nM and 13.3 μM respectively.”


1. This review didn’t mention dimethyl fumarate’s NQO1 induction CD value because..? It’s one of Nrf2 signaling pathway’s main studied parameters along with HO-1. For example, from Autism biomarkers and sulforaphane:

“This time point was chosen based on our earlier observations of the kinetics of upregulation of Nrf2-dependent genes by SF, and was expected to capture the increased mRNA production of both very fast (HO-1) and relatively slow (NQO1) responders.”

2. What about adverse effects? From Sulforaphane and RNAs:

“DMF is the most successful Nrf2 activator, FDA-approved in 2013 for the treatment of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. However, DMF causes leukopenia and other side-effects.

Bardoxolone cleared Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of advanced chronic kidney disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus, but was halted in Phase III trials due to cardiovascular concerns.”

3. What about prevention mechanisms for skin problems? Skin care isn’t just cancer prevention.


So, what can a person do to treat an inflammation problem in our largest organ – skin?

  • Pay $2,026 every two weeks to take a daily 120 mg dose of a brand name pharmaceutical?
  • Wait around for some hypothetical future “development of new tailor-made molecules and drugs for the many inflammatory conditions which are associated with Nrf2, NF-κB and inflammasomes”?
  • Try other treatments that just address symptoms, not causes?

Or eat daily clinically-relevant broccoli sprout dosages for < $500 a year?

Sulforaphane and RNAs

This 2020 Texas review subject was long non-coding RNAs:

“We review the emerging significance of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) as downstream targets and upstream regulators of the Nrf2 signaling pathway, a critical mediator of diverse cellular processes linked to increased cell survival.

It is believed that more than 3% of human genes are regulated by the Nrf2/Keap1 pathway. In addition to the classical cytoprotective and oxidative stress response genes transactivated by Nrf2, emerging evidence suggests a role for non-coding transcript regulation at the level of noncoding RNAs, [which] far outnumber protein-coding genes in the human genome.

One important distinction between miRNAs and lncRNAs is that the latter are often species-specific, meaning that a human lncRNA typically cannot be studied in the mouse or rat, and vice versa.

Sulforaphane (SFN) acts via multiple mechanisms to modulate gene expression, including the induction of Nrf2-dependent signaling. In addition to the established canonical targets of Nrf2, such as NQO1 and HMOX1, SFN altered the expression of multiple lncRNAs.

Given that SFN induces NMRAL2P [a lncRNA pseudogene] and several other lncRNAs in colon cancer cells, further studies are warranted on their respective roles as upstream regulators and/or downstream targets of Nrf2 signaling.

Pharmacological modulation of Nrf2 is considered a viable strategy against chronic conditions that are accompanied by oxidative stress and inflammation:

  • DMF [dimethyl fumurate] is the most successful Nrf2 activator, FDA-approved in 2013 for the treatment of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. However, DMF causes leukopenia and other side-effects.
  • Bardoxolone cleared Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of advanced chronic kidney disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus, but was halted in Phase III trials due to cardiovascular concerns.
  • SFN is relatively unstable at room temperature.

We used reported bioinformatics approaches to search for putative ARE [antioxidant response element] sequences among the entire set of 16,000+ annotated human lncRNAs. 13,285 promoter regions contained one or more potential binding sites for Nrf2.”

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304383520303670 “Emerging crosstalk between long non-coding RNAs and Nrf2 signaling”


This study hyped lncRNAs in that only 7 have been validated as Nrf2 targets, and 8 validated as Nrf2 regulators. For regulators, “protein and/or miRNA interacting partners are yet to be fully corroborated” as well.

Also, there’s no need for a “SFN is relatively unstable at room temperature” problem. Just create sulforaphane right before consuming it.

Twice a day I microwave an average 65.5 grams of 3-day-old broccoli sprouts immersed in 100 ml water with a 1000W microwave on full power for 35 seconds to achieve 60°C. After microwaving I transfer broccoli sprouts to a strainer, and wait five minutes to allow further myrosinase hydrolization of glucoraphanin and other glucosinolates into sulforaphane and other healthy compounds.

Caution on broccoli seed erucic acid content?

1. While looking through PubMed “broccoli skin” search results, I read a 2018 study Comparative Study of Predominant Phytochemical Compounds and Proapoptotic Potential of Broccoli Sprouts and Florets that cautioned about erucic acid content in broccoli seeds:

“Our results revealed significantly higher total UFAs [unsaturated fatty acids] content in the sprouts in comparison to the florets, with very low amounts of harmful erucic [27] acid in sprouts (0.5%) and florets (2%), in comparison to the broccoli seeds (38% – data not shown).”

But its cited reference [27] Various concentrations of erucic acid in mustard oil and mustard said nothing about broccoli seeds.

Values were on a dry weight basis. Broccoli sprout age was four days.

2. Another search found this 2017 Erucic acid in feed and food position paper which stated:

“When in this Scientific Opinion the erucic acid content is reported as a percentage, this value refers to the percentage erucic acid in the total fatty acids on a weight basis.

A tolerable daily intake of 7 mg/kg body weight per day for erucic acid was established.”

3. It referenced a 2002 Determination and Health Implication of the Erucic Acid Content of Broccoli Florets, Sprouts, and Seeds which stated:

“The erucic acid content of broccoli florets, sprouts, and seeds was found to be about 0.8, 320, and 12100 mg/100 g, respectively.”

Respective erucic acid percentages of total lipids on a fresh weight basis were provided as 0.4%, 1.1%, and 26.9%.

Florets, sprouts, and seeds had no relationships among them as they were different broccoli cultivars. Broccoli sprouts’ age wasn’t disclosed.

4. The 2002 study was updated in a 2004 Glucoraphanin and 4-Hydroxyglucobrassicin Contents in Seeds of 59 Cultivars of Broccoli, Raab, Kohlrabi, Radish, Cauliflower, Brussels Sprouts, Kale, and Cabbage which stated:

“All seed accessions contained substantial amounts of hexane-extractable lipids ranging from 21.8 to 42.0% (mean of 32.8%; 21.8-37.0 and 30.9% range and mean, respectively, for broccoli cultivars only), which were composed of 27.0-56.7% (mean of 46.7%;39.4-56.7 and 50.2% range and mean, respectively, for broccoli cultivars only) erucic acid.”

Seeds of the 2002 broccoli sprouts commercial product were measured at 31.4% lipids, with erucic acid content 51.6% of total lipids.

5. The 2018 study cited a 2013 Biochemical composition of broccoli seeds and sprouts at different stages of seedling development whose broccoli seed and sprout composition dry weights are in the below graphic:

  • Broccoli seed lipid percentage of total carbohydrates plus crude fiber would be 9.36 g / (58.89 g + 15.47 g) = 12.6%.
  • 3-day-old broccoli sprouts lipid percentage of total carbohydrates plus crude fiber would be 8.67 g / (54.4 g + 8.97 g) = 13.7%.
  • No erucic acid contents were disclosed.


These four studies all required further work:

  • 2002 couldn’t be bothered to use just one broccoli cultivar for its three measurements, or disclose broccoli sprout age.
  • 2004 couldn’t resolve many of their findings with other studies.
  • 2013 used weights to equate measurements, instead of relating germination stages back to a beginning number of seeds and their measurements.
  • 2018 provided a bogus reference and an unsupported “broccoli seeds (38% – data not shown).” It claimed similarity with 2013, but a statistics package would say otherwise. It also didn’t comply with disclosing fatty acids weight as a percentage of broccoli sprouts weight.

Home sprouting has to deal with:

  • unknown cultivar,
  • unknown glucoraphanin and other glucosinolates contents,
  • unknown sulforaphane and other healthy compounds, and now
  • unknown erucic acid content.

Let’s reverse Microwave broccoli seeds to create sulforaphane calculations with 3-day-old broccoli sprouts have the optimal yields information to estimate an erucic acid content in one tablespoon of broccoli seeds. Measurements from Week 18 and Week 19 of Changing to a youthful phenotype with broccoli sprouts.

  • Broccoli seed weight of one tablespoon 10.7 g.
  • Lipids weight (10.7 g x 12.6% [2013 study]) = 1.35 g.
  • Erucic acid weight in one tablespoon of broccoli seeds (1.35 g x 26.9% [2002 study]) = 0.36 g.

This 0.36 g erucic acid content would be lower than 2017 guidelines for my 70 kg weight (7 mg x 70) = 0.49 g.

Let’s reverse Estimating daily consumption of broccoli sprout compounds techniques to estimate an erucic acid content in my daily consumption of 3-day-old broccoli sprouts grown from two tablespoons of seeds:

  • 131 g 3-day-old broccoli sprouts.
  • Maximum lipids weight (131 g x 13.7% [2013 study]) = 17.9 g.
  • Maximum erucic acid weight in 3-day-old broccoli sprouts (17.9 g x 1.1% [2002 study]) = 0.20 g.

Plug in your own numbers, but it looks like caution isn’t warranted for broccoli seed consumption. Consequences of a possible erucic acid content may be less than broccoli seeds’ healthy aspects.

One mitigation may be to start germination. Pick a point between broccoli seeds’ % of total fatty acids and ending 0.5% of 4-day-old sprouts [2018 study].

Not concerned with a daily estimate < .49 g erucic acid for broccoli seeds and sprouts. Back to a PubMed “broccoli skin” search.

See Politically correct about erucic acid and broccoli seeds for a follow up.

Eat sauerkraut today!

This 2017 Spanish article reviewed health benefits of sauerkraut:

“During cabbage shredding and fermentation, a disruption of cabbage cells occurs, and GLS [glucosinolates] are hydrolyzed by myrosinase enzyme to a variety of GLS breakdown products. In particular, glucobrassicin is hydrolyzed into indol-3-carbinol (I3C) by myrosinase.

As the pH decreases during cabbage fermentation, I3C reacts nonenzymatically with ascorbic acid to yield ascorbigen (ABG). Studies have shown that ABG is the main GLS breakdown compound in sauerkraut, and it is present at levels between 3 and 18 μmol/100 g fw.

The antioxidant activity observed for sauerkraut in all studies was higher than that observed in raw cabbage.

It has been reported that doses between 53 and 150 μmol of ITCs [isothiocyanates] are enough to display anticarcinogenic effects. Taking into account that the content of ITCs in sauerkraut is in the range 22 μmol/100 g fw, it could be assumed that a weekly consumption of 200–250 g of sauerkraut would provide effective ITC doses to exert cancer chemopreventive effects.

Many studies reported that LAB [lactic acid bacteria] isolated from sauerkraut are potential probiotics.”

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128023099000248 “Sauerkraut: Production, Composition, and Health Benefits” (not freely available)


This introductory article presented interesting facts, but oversold sauerkraut. Dose and other conditional dependencies in order to achieve health and disease prevention benefits seemed to be beyond its scope.

A more considered view was offered in Fermented Food and Non-Communicable Chronic Diseases which referenced this article:

“Clinical data about the effects of sauerkraut on the human organism, health and disease are scarce. There is knowledge concerning particular compounds in sauerkraut and their impacts on diseases; however, a literature search revealed mostly cell line or rat experiments with very limited conclusions for humans.”


Earlier this month I started eating refrigerated sauerkraut twice a day with microwaved broccoli sprouts. I mix in three heaping teaspoons each time, and finish a 50 oz (1418 g) container in a week.

The mixture tastes better than just microwaved broccoli sprouts. It requires more chewing, which assists myrosinase hydrolization of broccoli sprout glucosinolates into sulforaphane and other healthy compounds.

Although sauerkraut isn’t a primary source, there may be beneficial amounts of probiotics etc. that increase what I get with broccoli sprouts and supplements.

I also started making my own sauerkraut using the commercial product’s juice as a starter. I add garlic but not salt. No results yet.

Part 2 of Do broccoli sprouts treat migraines?

To follow up Do broccoli sprouts treat migraines? which used a PubMed “sulforaphane migraine” search, a PubMed “diindolylmethane” search came across a 2020 Czech human cell study Antimigraine Drug Avitriptan Is a Ligand and Agonist of Human Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor that Induces CYP1A1 in Hepatic and Intestinal Cells that had this informative Introduction:

“The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transcriptionally controls a wide array of genes. AhR is a critical player in human physiology (e.g., hematopoiesis) and also in many pathophysiological processes such as diabetes, carcinogenesis, inflammation, infection or cardiovascular diseases.

Suitable candidates for off-targeting AhR could be the antimigraine drugs of triptan class, which have an indole core in their structure. Indole-based compounds were demonstrated as ligands of AhR, including dietary indoles (e.g., indole-3-carbinol and diindolylmethane).”

Adding AhR to the search showed:

Changing the PubMed search to “icz migraine” pulled up a 2013 review Biomedical Importance of Indoles that described sumatriptan as an indole, and:

“Since DIM accumulates in the cell nucleus, it likely contributes to cell nuclear events that have been ascribed to I3C.”

Widening the search to “i3c ahr” added:

Changing the search to “i3c migraine” picked up a 2011 UK human study Effect of diindolylmethane supplementation on low-grade cervical cytological abnormalities: double-blind, randomised, controlled trial:

“In the study reported here, there was no statistically significant difference in serious adverse events between groups; in fact a higher proportion of women in the placebo group reported a serious adverse event. Although this study did not have sufficient power to study migraines, we did find a non-significant increase in reported headaches (18% on DIM, 12% on placebo, P=0.12).”

Returning to the original PubMed “sulforaphane migraine” search, Bioavailability of Sulforaphane Following Ingestion of Glucoraphanin-Rich Broccoli Sprout and Seed Extracts with Active Myrosinase: A Pilot Study of the Effects of Proton Pump Inhibitor Administration included one subject who took migraine medication. They weren’t a study outlier, however.


Although indole chemistry indicates a broccoli sprouts – migraine connection, I haven’t found relevant research. Maybe the known properties and actions of broccoli sprout compounds provide enough to affect causes of migraines?

See Part 3 to follow up.

Eat broccoli sprouts for DIM

This 2019 Spanish human study ran in parallel with Our model clinical trial for Changing to a youthful phenotype with broccoli sprouts. I’ll focus on the aspect of diindolylmethane (DIM) from eating broccoli sprouts:

“The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of gender or hormonal status (menopause) on the bioavailability of broccoli sprouts in different cohorts of overweight adult subjects: men, non-menopausal women and post-menopausal women.

3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM) was detected and quantified in all volunteers. It increased significantly during broccoli [sprouts] ingestion in men. However, a steady decrease of its urinary concentration was observed in post-menopausal women that was significant at day 50. No significant changes were observed in premenopausal women. Albeit this different behaviour, no significant differences between the three groups were detected by the different statistical tests performed.

High increases observed in SFN-metabolites in the three cohorts confirm that the fresh product is a good source of bioactive compounds bioavailable in the organism. We detected high amounts of 3,3-DIM in urine samples, which can be related to the metabolism of glucobrassicin derivatives from our broccoli sprouts.

Post-menopausal women seem to metabolize isothiocyanates in a greater extension. Hormonal status and differences in gut microbiota may influence the bioavailability of isothiocyanates from broccoli sprouts but more studies are needed to support this statement.”

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1756464619303147 “Bioavailability of broccoli sprouts in different human overweight populations” (not freely available)


“Post-menopausal women seem to metabolize isothiocyanates in a greater extension. A steady decrease of its [DIM] urinary concentration was observed in post-menopausal women that was significant at day 50.”

Subjects ate broccoli sprouts every day through Day 35, then stopped, and were measured again at Day 50. The only example of measurements where Day 35 was less than Day 0 was postmenopausal women retaining more broccoli sprout indolic compounds’ metabolite, DIM, than excreting it.

That Day 35 data point didn’t have an asterisk next to it to indicate a statistically significant decrease. But the group’s next Day 50 significant “steady decrease” finding supported an interpretation that eating broccoli sprouts supplied those overweight postmenopausal women with DIM that they especially needed.

Regarding the huge percentage changes above, our model clinical trial found in a longer time frame:

The decrease in IL-6 levels was significantly related to the increase in 24 h urine SFN [sulforaphane] levels. In case of C-reactive protein, the decrease was significantly related to the increases in 24 h urine SFN-NAC [SFN-N-acetylcysteine] and SFN-CYS [SFN-cysteine].

I’ll guess that these parallel trial subjects also experienced similar benefits from eating broccoli  sprouts every day for five weeks. See Day 70 results from Changing to a youthful phenotype with broccoli sprouts for another guess that even shorter time frames would be effective.


Broccoli sprout indolic compounds that metabolize to DIM:

A claim of improved cognitive function

I’ll describe evidence for claiming improved cognitive function in Week 9 of Changing to a youthful phenotype with broccoli sprouts.

I read parts of over a hundred research papers last week. That required substantial concentration to understand them, and stay on topic while learning new items, which started new searches. This wasn’t a new development, it was just to a much greater extent. I also worked forty hours for my job.

The main chain of blog posts began when I relooked at the presentation in Reversal of aging and immunosenescent trends after remembering it included before and after photos per A hair color anecdote. The presentation prompted last week’s most frequent self-question, Why didn’t I see this before?

One possible explanation is that people don’t usually see things outside their conditioned perceptions. (1) Reevaluate findings in another paradigm illustrated this with an example of how different frameworks viewed the same hypothalamus study differently.

I was interested to see what sulforaphane research had in common with the presentation topics, which produced (2) Reversal of aging and immunosenescent trends with sulforaphane. That required gaining a better understanding of PubMed search techniques, which led to (3) A pair of broccoli sprout studies.

Numerous presentation topics resulted in (4) Part 2 of Reversal of aging and immunosenescent trends with sulforaphane. I investigated one of its cited papers in (5) A review of sulforaphane and aging, which required further searches, some of which are still on tabs of my browser.

I was happy to oblige special requests with (6) Tailoring measurements for broccoli sprouts and (7) Uses of the lymphocytes to monocytes ratio.

Could I have done all of what I did last week without changing my internal environment? What exactly are the effects of eating a clinically relevant amount of broccoli sprouts every day for nine weeks?

A plausible explanation is in Upgrade your brain’s switchboard with broccoli sprouts.

A review of sulforaphane and aging

This 2019 Mexican review stated:

“We describe some of the molecular and physical characteristics of SFN, its mechanisms of action, and the effects that SFN treatment induces in order to discuss its relevance as a ‘miraculous’ drug to prevent aging and neurodegeneration. SFN has been shown to modulate several cellular pathways in order to activate diverse protective responses, which might allow avoiding cancer and neurodegeneration as well as improving cellular lifespan and health span.

NF-κB is in charge of inflammatory response regulation. Under basal conditions, NF-κB is sequestrated into the cytosol by IκB, but when pro-inflammatory ligands bind to its receptors, the IKK protein family phosphorylates IκB to degrade it via proteasome, so NF-κB is able to translocate into the nucleus and transcript several inflammatory mediators. Sulforaphane is capable to inhibit IκB phosphorylation and NF-κB nuclear translocation.

SFN upregulated Nrf2 expression by reducing DNA demethylation levels of the Nrf2 promoter. In another model using the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (3 × Tg-AD), the use of SFN regulates the expression of the Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) via HDAC inhibition, thus increasing H3 and H4 acetylation on the BDNF promoter. Enhancing BDNF expression as an effect of SFN treatment increased the neuronal content of several synaptic molecules like MAP 2, synaptophysin, and PSD-95 in primary cortical neurons of 3 × Tg-AD.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6885086/ “Sulforaphane – role in aging and neurodegeneration”


I came across this review while searching PubMed for sulforaphane commonalities with presentation topics in Part 2 of Reversal of aging and immunosenescent trends with sulforaphane. The review outlined some aging aspects and presented relevant sulforaphane studies. Others such as eye and muscle decline weren’t addressed.

Since sulforaphane’s “a ‘miraculous’ drug” in the Abstract, I expected but didn’t see corresponding excitement in the review body. Just phrases like “it is known” and non-specific “more research is needed.”

Other papers published after this review were found by a PubMed “sulforaphane signal aging” search: