Reversing epigenetic T cell exhaustion

This 2019 worldwide discussion among 18 experts concerned T cell exhaustion:

“‘T cell exhaustion’ is a broad term that has been used to describe the response of T cells to chronic antigen stimulation, first in the setting of chronic viral infection but more recently in response to tumours.

Key questions remain about the potential to reverse the epigenetic programme of exhaustion and how this might affect the persistence of T cell populations.”


There were nearly a dozen viewpoints on even “What do we mean by T cell exhaustion and/or dysfunction and how would you define this state?” 🙂

Answers to the question “What are the key controversies and outstanding research questions?” included:

  • “What are the cellular signalling and transcriptional pathways that drive the conversion to an exhausted T cell phenotype, and how can the chromatin and transcriptional changes of exhaustion be reversed in individual exhausted cells?
  • Whether and how we can manipulate signalling pathways to both activate and maintain T cell responses remain open questions, as does the question of whether pharmacological manipulations can reverse the epigenetic changes associated with exhaustion versus expand less-exhausted populations.
  • We need to define better the effects of the microenvironment on the induction of T cell exhaustion, the developmental trajectories of exhaustion and the point at which and extent to which exhaustion can be reversed. Understanding the consequences of unleashing T cells from exhaustion will also be crucial to designing the most effective therapeutic interventions.
  • When and how exhausted T cell populations are formed. The original view that they are terminally differentiated descendants of formerly ‘normal’ effector T cells has been challenged.
  • Whether the predysfunctional T cells themselves, or their more differentiated (and phenotypically dysfunctional) progeny, form the ultimate effector pool for control of human tumours.
  • How do the functions and states (subpopulations) of exhausted T cells change over time? Can the epigenetic state of exhaustion be reversed to form true effector or memory T cells, and is this required for improved cancer immunotherapy?
  • There is no definitive marker for exhausted T cells, although TOX may prove to be useful. Transcriptional profiles are informative, but epigenetic changes are more specific and robust. A major clinical question is whether exhausted T cells can be, or indeed need to be, reprogrammed to achieve therapeutic benefit.”

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41577-019-0221-9 “Defining ‘T cell exhaustion'” (not freely available)

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This 2019 Finnish review focused on vitamin D’s immune system effects:

“The epigenome of human monocytes is at multiple levels sensitive to vitamin D. These data served as the basis for the chromatin model of vitamin D signaling, which mechanistically explains the activation of a few hundred primary vitamin D target genes.

Vitamin D and its receptor are able to antagonize the pro-inflammatory actions of the transcription factors nuclear factor activated T cells (NF-AT) and nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) in T cells. In this way, vitamin D reduces autoimmunity, such as the onset and progression of multiple sclerosis, as well as chronic inflammation.

Population-wide recommendations do not take inter-individual variations into account, such as a different molecular response to vitamin D, which are expressed by the vitamin D response index. Instead of population-based recommendations for vitamin D3 supplementation there should be personalized recommendations in order to reach a vitamin D status that is optimized for an individual’s health protection.

Trained immunity implies that immune cells memorize challenges, to which they are exposed in their rather short lifespan, in form of changes of their epigenome leading to subtype specification. The stabilization of the epigenomes of the subtypes of monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells by vitamin D can prevent or delay the onset of common age-related diseases.”


One of the five elements of the clinical trial Reversal of aging and immunosenescent trends was daily 3,000 IU vitamin D3 supplementation for nine months. That study’s monocyte findings included:

“Analysis of CyTOF‐defined immune cell populations revealed the most robust changes to be decreases in total and CD38‐positive monocytes and resulting increases in the lymphocyte‐to‐monocyte ratio (LMR). The changes in mean monocyte populations persisted 6 months after discontinuation of treatment, and the increase in LMR remained highly significant at 18 months as well.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6753645/ “Vitamin D Signaling in the Context of Innate Immunity: Focus on Human Monocytes”

Reversal of aging and immunosenescent trends

The title of this post is essentially the same as the 2019 human clinical trial:

“Epigenetic aging can be reversed in humans. Using a protocol intended to regenerate the thymus, we observed protective immunological changes, improved risk indices for many age‐related diseases, and a mean epigenetic age approximately 1.5 years less than baseline after 1 year of treatment.

This is to our knowledge the first report of an increase, based on an epigenetic age estimator, in predicted human lifespan by means of a currently accessible aging intervention.”

“Example of treatment‐induced change in thymic MRI appearance. Darkening corresponds to replacement of fat with nonadipose tissue. White lines denote the thymic boundary. Volunteer 2 at 0 (a) and 9 (b) months”

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/acel.13028 “Reversal of epigenetic aging and immunosenescent trends in humans”


Here’s a 2017 interview with the clinical trial lead author:

“You might also say that what also happened was to just postpone death from infectious diseases to after 60-65 years of age, which means that the same basic problem still remains.”


The popular press botched the facts as they usually do. I won’t link the UK Independent article because they couldn’t be bothered to even define epigenetic clock correctly.

A science journal article did a better job of explaining the study to readers. However, they often used hyperbole instead of trying to promote understanding.

Josh Mitteldorf’s blog post 1st Age Reversal Results—Is it HGH or Something Else? provided the most informative explanations:

“In 2015, Fahy finally had funding and regulatory approval to replicate his one-man trial in a still-tiny sample of ten men, aged 51-65. That it took so long is an indictment of everything about the way aging research is funded in this country; and not just aging – all medical research is prioritized according to projected profits rather than projected health benefits.”

Take care reading the post’s comments. Both non-scientist (such as Mark, Adrian, and others) and scientist commentators (such as Gustavo, Jeff, and others) attempted to hijack the discussion into their pet theories of reality in which they imagined themselves to be the definitive authorities. My discussion comment – with respect to a Mayo Clinic warning about DHEA – was: “19 instances of the word ‘might’ doesn’t lend itself to credibility.”

Effects of advanced glycation end products on quality of life and lifespan

This 2018 Chinese review concerned advanced glycation end products (AGE) mobility interventions:

“Only a limited number of studies have focused on measuring the effects of low AGEs levels or AGEs inhibitors on mobility, although many observational human studies and in vitro studies have reported the correlation of AGEs with and the contribution of AGEs to mobility, particular in diseases such as:

  • osteoporosis,
  • cartilage degradation,
  • osteoarthritis and
  • sarcopenia.

There is insufficient information from previous animal and human studies for use as a reference to determine the intervention period. Although serum AGEs levels can be easily affected by a lower AGEs diet or AGEs inhibitors, it may take longer to see the changes in certain organs or tissues, as a result of a reduction in AGEs accumulation.”

 

“Effect of AGEs on apoptosis signalling. AP-1, activator protein 1; ERK, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases; IGF-I, insulin-like growth factor I; IL-6, interleukin-6; JAK, Janus kinase; JNK, c-Jun N-terminal kinases; MEK, mitogen-activated protein kinase; NF-κB, nuclear factor kappa B; p38 MAPK, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase; RAGE, receptor for AGEs; STAT3, signal transducers and activators of transcription 3; TGF-β, transforming growth factor-β”


Citations aren’t validations of the reference’s quality and strength of evidence. This review would have benefited from not citing reviews that contained misrepresentations, such as one mentioned in Wikipedia is a poor source of information on advanced glycation end products (AGEs).

I came across this review as a result of it citing the excellent 2008 rodent study Oral Glycotoxins Determine the Effects of Calorie Restriction on Oxidant Stress, Age-Related Diseases, and Lifespan which found:

“Higher levels of oxidant AGEs in offspring of Reg-F0 dams may be attributable to placental transmission from mothers with high AGE levels. These high intrauterine AGE levels may predispose the offspring to the development of chronic inflammation and diseases in adulthood, such as insulin resistance and diabetes.

Increasing the intake of AGEs in the diet erases the benefits of CR [calorie restriction]. OS [oxidant stress] can be reduced, and healthspan increased, in mice fed a diet that is restricted in the content of AGEs.

The beneficial effects of a CR diet may be partly related to reduced oxidant intake rather than decreased energy intake.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6180645/ “Role of advanced glycation end products in mobility and considerations in possible dietary and nutritional intervention strategies”

Caloric restriction’s epigenetic effects

This 2019 US review subject was caloric restriction (CR) without malnutrition:

“Cellular adaptation that occurs in response to dietary patterns can be explained by alterations in epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNA. Epigenetic reprogramming of the underlying chronic low-grade inflammation by CR can lead to immuno-metabolic adaptations that enhance quality of life, extend lifespan, and delay chronic disease onset.

Short- and long-term CRs produce significant changes in different tissues and across species, in some animal models even with sex-specific effects. Early CR onset may cause a different and even an opposite effect on physiological outcomes in animal models such as body weight.”

 


1. Charts usually don’t have two different values plotted on the same axis. There wasn’t evidence that equated survival with methylation drift per the above graphic. Methylation drift should point in the opposite direction of survival, if anything.

2. No mention was made of the epigenetic clock method of measuring age acceleration, although it’s been available since 2013 and recent diet studies have used it. The sole citation of an age acceleration study was from 2001, which was unacceptable for a review published in 2019.

3. The review provided many cellular-level details about the subject. However, organism-level areas weren’t sufficiently evidenced:

A. Arguments for an effect usually include explanations for no effect as well as opposite effects. The reviewers didn’t provide direct evidence for why, if caloric restriction extended lifespan, caloric overabundance produced shorter lifespans.

B. Caloric restriction evidence was presented as if only it was responsible for organism-level effects. Other mechanisms may have been involved.

An example of such a mechanism was demonstrated in a 2007 rodent study Reduced Oxidant Stress and Extended Lifespan in Mice Exposed to a Low Glycotoxin Diet which compared two 40%-calorie-restricted diets.

The calories and composition of both diets were identical. However, advanced glycation end product (AGE) levels were doubled in standard chow because heating temperatures were “sufficiently high to inadvertently cause standard mouse chow to be rich in oxidant AGEs.”

The study found that a diet with lower chow heating temperatures increased lifespan and health span irrespective of caloric restriction!

  • The low-AGE calorie-restricted diet group lived an average of 15% longer (>20 human equivalent years) than the CR group.
  • 40% of the low-AGE calorie-restricted diet group were still alive when the last CR group member died.
  • The CR group also had significantly more: 1) oxidative stress damage; 2) glucose and insulin metabolism problems; and 3) kidney, spleen, and liver injuries.

https://academic.oup.com/advances/article-abstract/10/3/520/5420411 “Epigenetic Regulation of Metabolism and Inflammation by Calorie Restriction” (not freely available)

Wikipedia is a poor source of information on advanced glycation end products (AGEs)

A link to Wikipedia is usually on the first page of search results. The Wikipedia post on AGEs lacks the evidence that a reader may infer from its text.

For example, the second paragraph of the AGEs post, Dietary Sources, contained the following text and references:

  1. “However, only low molecular weight AGEs are absorbed through diet, and vegetarians have been found to have higher concentrations of overall AGEs compared to non-vegetarians. [4]
  2. Therefore it is unclear whether dietary AGEs contribute to disease and aging, or whether only endogenous AGEs (those produced in the body) matter. [5]
  3. This does not free diet from potentially negatively influencing AGE, but implicates dietary AGE may be less important than other aspects of diet that lead to elevated blood sugar levels and formation of AGEs. [4] [5]”

[4] https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0278691513004444 “Advanced glycation end products in food and their effects on health” (not freely available) 2013 Denmark.

Please note on this linked page that a German researcher took the time to correct one bias of the Danish reviewers, citing evidence from his studies that:

“The deleterious effects of food-derived AGEs in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus are proven.”

[5] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3257625 “Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products and Aging” 2010 US.


Both of these references were reviews.

Unlike study researchers, reviewers aren’t bound to demonstrate evidence from tested hypotheses. Reviewers are free to:

  • Express their beliefs as facts;
  • Over/under emphasize study limitations; and
  • Disregard and misrepresent evidence as they see fit.

Reviewers also aren’t obligated to make post-publication corrections for their errors and distortions. For example, the Danes didn’t correct their review with any findings the German researcher presented.

As such, reviews can’t be cited for reliable evidence.


A sample of other problems with each of the Wikipedia sentences:

1. “However, only low molecular weight AGEs are absorbed through diet, and vegetarians have been found to have higher concentrations of overall AGEs compared to non-vegetarians. [4]”

The first part of sentence 1 came from the review’s abstract:

“Only LMW AGEs..may be absorbed from the gut and contribute to the body burden of AGEs.”

But the reviewers didn’t support their abstract’s statement with direct evidence from any study!

2. “Therefore it is unclear whether dietary AGEs contribute to disease and aging, or whether only endogenous AGEs (those produced in the body) matter. [5]”

The “therefore” of sentence 2 was misplaced. Sentence 1 didn’t attempt to explain whether “dietary AGEs contribute to disease and aging” or “only endogenous AGEs matter.”

Since sentence 2 wasn’t a consequence of sentence 1, the Wikipedia contributor(s) needed to support sentence 2 with evidence. Citing an “unclear” 2010 reference [5] ignored dozens of studies that provided better clarity.

3. “This does not free diet from potentially negatively influencing AGE, but implicates dietary AGE may be less important than other aspects of diet that lead to elevated blood sugar levels and formation of AGEs. [4] [5]”

Wikipedia contributors tend to cite irrelevant references rather than get flagged with “citation needed.” The value judgment of sentence 3 was an example of this intentionally misleading masquerade.

“Dietary AGE may be less important..” wasn’t unequivocally supported by studies referenced in either review, and didn’t represent an authoritative body of evidence. Contrast those weasel words with:

“The deleterious effects of food-derived AGEs in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus are proven.”

Good job, Wikipedia contributors! You used lower-quality reviews to promote misunderstandings that DETRACTED from science.


Wikipedia’s premise is that since the group knows more about any subject than does any individual, everyone is entitled to contribute. The results are usually incoherent narratives that often substitute opinions for evidence.

The second paragraph of the Exogenous section of the Wikipedia glycation post provided an example:

  • Assertions of the first and third sentences needed citations. Did the contributor(s) think these would be unexamined?
  • Someone contributed a cancer reference as the fourth sentence, although it had little to do with the preceding sentences.
  • The fifth sentence was informative on exogenous glycations and AGEs. An editor would have removed “recently” and “recent” though, because the cited source was dated 2005.

Disease and advanced glycation end products (AGEs)

This 2015 French/US review focused on chronic kidney disease, appropriate for its publication in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology:

“Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are formed not only in the presence of hyperglycemia, but also in diseases associated with high levels of oxidative stress, such as CKD. Humans are exposed to exogenous sources of AGE (diet and cigarette smoke) and endogenous sources of AGE when the organism is exposed to high levels of glucose, such as in diabetes.

Accumulation of AGEs in patients with CKD has been shown to result from inflammation, oxidative stress, and diet. AGEs are proinflammatory and pro-oxidative compounds that play a role in the high prevalence of endothelial dysfunction and subsequent cardiovascular disease in patients with CKD.

In view of the many harmful effects of AGEs on cell function, it is essential to develop strategies designed to counteract their effects. AGEs are generated during the thermal processing and storage of foods. Dietary restriction is an effective, feasible, and economic method to reduce the levels of toxic AGEs and possibly, the associated cardiovascular mortality.”


I came across the AGE subject in the usual Internet way. 🙂 While reading the comments on Josh Mitteldorf’s blog post Money in Aging Research, Part I, Dr. Alan Green mentioned Dr. Helen Vlassara’s work on the subject. A DuckDuckGo search led to her 31,708 citations the first day I checked. That number increases every day.

Another read on the subject is her 2016 book Dr. Vlassara’s AGE-Less Diet: How a Chemical in the Foods We Eat Promotes Disease, Obesity, and Aging and the Steps We Can Take to Stop It. A practical guide is her 2017 book The AGE Food Guide: A Quick Reference to Foods and the AGEs They Contain.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/281281887_Uremic_Toxicity_of_Advanced_Glycation_End_Products_in_CKD “Uremic Toxicity of Advanced Glycation End Products in CKD” (registration required)