Broccoli sprouts’ immune effects

Two 2021 papers, with the first’s subject being sulforaphane’s immune effects:

“Effects of sulforaphane (SFN) on immune response generate scientific interest because of its bioavailability, which is much higher than other phytochemicals, and its capacity to induce Nrf2 target genes. Clinical trials suggest that sulforaphane produces favorable results in cases where pharmaceutical products fail.

SFN exhibits the highest bioavailability among well-known antioxidant phytochemicals, such as quercetin (20-fold higher) and curcumin (80-fold higher). SFN confers a high potential to be used either as a nutraceutical to improve health status, or as pharmaceutical to treat disease states.

molecules-26-00752-g001

Sulforaphane exerts a pleiotropic effect on immunological response, and the final effect depends on cell type.

  • In lymphocyte T-cells, SFN induces ROS production, GSH depletion, and repression of inflammatory cytokines, resulting in suppression of immune and inflammatory responses.
  • In monocytes and macrophages, SFN stimulates immune response by inducing Nrf2, thus triggering antioxidant and anti-inflammatory responses.”

https://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/26/3/752/htm “Potential of Sulforaphane as a Natural Immune System Enhancer: A Review”


A second study was Fertilization and Pre-Sowing Seed Soaking Affect Yield and Mineral Nutrients of Ten Microgreen Species:

“Ten tested microgreen species [amaranth, arugula, basil, broccoli, red cabbage, Daikon radish, kale, kohlrabi, mustard, and green pea] in this study varied in fresh and dry shoot weights, shoot height, and mineral nutrient concentrations.”

This study grew sprouts for 6 – 18 days before harvesting. Its study design didn’t require sampling along the way to discover informative compositional changes, as did 2020’s 3-day-old broccoli sprouts have the optimal yields and Broccoli sprout compounds include sinapic acid derivatives.

Their supplier was the same as I used for broccoli and red cabbage seeds. No endorsement is intended.

I’d rather use an unknown broccoli variety than this study’s broccoli cultivar, Waltham 29. It was found to be relatively glucoraphanin-deficient when measured in a 2004 study referenced in Tailoring measurements for broccoli sprouts, 32nd of 34 tested.

Received these today:

PXL_20210424_191628875

I’ve asked for clarification of the red cabbage seed variety I received. Not sure what “Agnostic” means in a “Red Cabbage Microgreen – Agnostic” context. 🙂

Mustard and red cabbage sprouting will follow Improving healthy compounds of broccoli sprouts efforts, minus that study’s laboratory setup and duration. I expect synergistic effects from handling both species’ sprouts with my protocol for microwaved 3-day-old broccoli sprouts.

2 thoughts on “Broccoli sprouts’ immune effects

  1. Thanks for your info. I’ve been really interested in sulforaphane to help with anxiety and depression, and there is quit a bit of evidence suggesting it works. Just curious, i like the 2 hour microwave solution with the seeds as i don’t find eating 100 grams of sprouts very palatable, but i was wondering what the content of sulphoraphane in the seeds were, and if grounding them up would work, and if they would store for any period of time without losing effetiveness.

    • Hi Yowzees! Thanks for commenting.
      Regarding palatability, my current practice of one-third 3-day-old mustard sprouts twice daily works for me. Previous attempts of incorporating mustard for taste weren’t sustainable, mainly because mustard’s allyl isothiocyanate was too much.

      Sulforaphane is ephemeral, and could degrade quickly with grinding seeds. Several studies I’ve curated have recommended as did A follow-on study to 3-day-old broccoli sprouts have the optimal yields:
      “It was best to enzymatically convert to SF before oral intake.” i.e. just before.
      That study developed evidence of sulforaphane degradation over time.

      I hadn’t thought of grinding 2-hour soaked seeds just before microwaving them. Let me know if that works for you.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.