Grow a Victory Garden in mason jars

I tried a new process with success during the past 27th week of eating broccoli sprouts every day. My son suggested that mason jars with strainer lids would streamline the broccoli sprout production process. He was right, and then some.

I start a new batch every twelve hours. The left jar contained soaking seeds.

Here are thirteen measurements from this week compared with weights of a similar period last month. Starting amounts of broccoli seeds were all 10.7 grams, batches were rinsed three times each day on a 12 hour-6 hour-6 hour schedule, and weights taken at the 72-hour point:

Higher weights with less variation were reflected in broccoli sprout sizes. Few sprouts grew over one inch in three days when in bowls, but look at them now:

Larger broccoli sprouts taste better, too. After microwaving them on 1000W full power for 35 seconds to achieve up to but not exceeding 60°C (140°F), I wait five minutes to allow further myrosinase hydrolization of glucoraphanin and other glucosinolates into sulforaphane and other healthy compounds.

Further changes from what’s outlined in Step 5 of Grow a broccoli sprouts Victory Garden today! include:

  • I don’t shape batches anymore. I do fill each pint jar to the top and let it sit for five minutes in order to soak all seeds and sprouts.
  • I leave cooking water in after microwaving rather than straining it out. Although some leaching of water-soluble glucoraphanin may occur, I drink that water anyway.
  • I don’t mix in mustard, sauerkraut, or other flavorings. Still trying to make unsalted sauerkraut that tastes good.

I mistakenly pasted in a 9/10 p.m. value of 69.9 grams instead of its a.m. value of 66.0. Correcting it in my workbook changed the sample average from 68.8 g to 68.5 g. The correction didn’t change either the sample’s 4.9 g standard deviation value or the null hypothesis’ failed-test 0.0258 p-value.


This post is my one and only experiment with using the “new” retro Word Press block editor to start a new blog post. 😦 Word Press management knew this non-productive change was a non-starter, but foisted it on their users for their own convenience. 😦

They require me – along with hundreds of thousands of Word Press users – to edit blog posts with it. 😦 If retro is better, why don’t we all just go back eight decades to the most primitive text editor?

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