Prisoners of our childhoods

Same old shit – another failed relationship. Coincident with the start of our relationship, I was struck by a phrase by Dr. Janov, posted in Beyond Belief: What we do instead of getting well: “It doesn’t matter about the facts we know..if we cannot maintain a relationship with someone else.” I kept that thought in … Continue reading Prisoners of our childhoods

How one person’s paradigms regarding stress and epigenetics impedes relevant research

This 2017 review laid out the tired, old, restrictive guidelines by which current US research on the epigenetic effects of stress is funded. The reviewer rehashed paradigms circumscribed by his authoritative position in guiding funding, and called for more government funding to support and extend his reach. The reviewer won’t change his beliefs regarding individual … Continue reading How one person’s paradigms regarding stress and epigenetics impedes relevant research

Beyond Belief: What we do instead of getting well

Continuing Dr. Arthur Janov’s May 2016 book Beyond Belief: “p. 61 Heavy pains with no place to go just pressures the cortex into concocting an idea commensurate with the feeling..The feeling itself makes no sense since the original feeling has no scene with it nor verbal capacity; it was laid down in a preverbal time … Continue reading Beyond Belief: What we do instead of getting well

Beyond Belief: The impact of merciless beatings on beliefs

Continuing with Dr. Arthur Janov’s May 2016 book Beyond Belief: “p. 17 When someone insults us, we immediately create reasons and rationales for it. We cover the pain. Now imagine a whole early childhood of insults and assaults and how that leaves a legacy that must be dealt with. ..The mind of ideas and philosophies … Continue reading Beyond Belief: The impact of merciless beatings on beliefs

Epigenetics account for two-thirds of Alzheimer’s disease

The genetics percentage from a 2017 summary of Alzheimer’s disease research caught my eye: “Although numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have now been robustly associated with AD via genome-wide association studies and subsequent meta-analyses, collectively these common SNPs are believed to only account for 33% of attributable risk and the mechanism behind their action remains … Continue reading Epigenetics account for two-thirds of Alzheimer’s disease

A limited study of parental transmission of anxiety/stress-reactive traits

This 2016 New York rodent study found: “Parental behavioural traits can be transmitted by non-genetic mechanisms to the offspring. We show that four anxiety/stress-reactive traits are transmitted via independent iterative-somatic and gametic epigenetic mechanisms across multiple generations. As the individual traits/pathways each have their own generation-dependent penetrance and gender specificity, the resulting cumulative phenotype is … Continue reading A limited study of parental transmission of anxiety/stress-reactive traits

Does childhood trauma influence offspring’s birth characteristics?

This 2016 Swedish human study investigated the effects of one specific childhood trauma, parental death: “Parental (G1) death during (G2) childhood predicts prematurity and lower birthweight in the offspring generation (G3). This response is dependent on G2 gender, G2 age at exposure and G3 parity, but not on G3 gender. Offspring of women who lost … Continue reading Does childhood trauma influence offspring’s birth characteristics?

Why drugs aren’t ultimately therapeutic

This 2016 Oregon review’s concept was the inadequacy of drug-based therapies, explored with the specific subject of epilepsy: “Currently used antiepileptic drugs: [aren’t] effective in over 30% of patients [don’t] affect the comorbidities of epilepsy [don’t] prevent the development and progression of epilepsy (epileptogenesis). Prevention of epilepsy and its progression [requires] novel conceptual advances.” The … Continue reading Why drugs aren’t ultimately therapeutic

Using salivary microRNA to diagnose autism

This 2016 New York human study found: “Measurement of salivary miRNA in this pilot study of subjects with mild ASD [autism spectrum disorder] demonstrated differential expression of 14 miRNAs that are: expressed in the developing brain, impact mRNAs related to brain development, and correlate with neurodevelopmental measures of adaptive behavior.” Some problems with current diagnostic … Continue reading Using salivary microRNA to diagnose autism

Observing pain in others had long-lasting brain effects

This 2016 Israeli human study used whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) to study pain perception in military veterans: “Our findings demonstrate alterations in pain perception following extreme pain exposure, chart the sequence from automatic to evaluative pain processing, and emphasize the importance of considering past experiences in studying the neural response to others’ states. Differences in brain … Continue reading Observing pain in others had long-lasting brain effects