We believe what we need to believe

While getting ready for bed tonight, I mused about how my younger brother had such an idealized postmortem view of our father. As he expressed six years ago in an obituary for our high school Literature teacher: “I’ll remember my favorite teacher and how much he’s meant to my life. My father and Martin Obrentz … Continue reading We believe what we need to believe

Your need to feel important will run your life, and you’ll never feel satisfied

Yesterday’s team meeting at work provided one display after another of a person’s need to feel important. These eye-openers were the reason the scheduled 30-minute meeting lasted 45 minutes. Although half of the forty or so attendees are under the age of 40, curiously, only two of them spoke during the meeting. I wasn’t among … Continue reading Your need to feel important will run your life, and you’ll never feel satisfied

Do we need to study the brain to understand the mind?

A coauthor of the studies referenced in: Advance science by including emotion in research; and Empathy, value, pain, control: Psychological functions of the human striatum offered an opinion piece in A Paper a Day Keeps the Scientist Okay entitled “Do We Need To Study The Brain To Understand The Mind?” “The emerging consensus appears to … Continue reading Do we need to study the brain to understand the mind?

Publicly-funded researchers need to provide unqualified free access to their studies

A magazine article New Clues to How the Brain Maps Time reviewed the findings of a 2015 Boston rodent study During Running in Place, Grid Cells Integrate Elapsed Time and Distance Run. The article’s information was mixed such that when the reader arrived at this phrase: “Moreover, time cells rely on context; they only mark … Continue reading Publicly-funded researchers need to provide unqualified free access to their studies

The need for a mother’s love

This 2014 wild chimpanzee study demonstrated how necessary it was to have a mother’s “nourishment, transportation, warmth, protection, and socialization,” in other words, a mother’s love, during infancy and early childhood. http://www.pnas.org/content/111/51/18189.full “Early social exposure in wild chimpanzees: Mothers with sons are more gregarious than mothers with daughters”

Microwave broccoli sprouts to increase sulforaphane

This 2020 review explored sulforaphane stability and formation: “Sulforaphane (SF) is beneficial to our health since it can reduce incidence of a number of tumors, induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in multiple experimental models. However, since neither SF nor myrosinase is thermostable, it is essential to increase stability of SF and/or enhance conversion of … Continue reading Microwave broccoli sprouts to increase sulforaphane

Evaluating a company-sponsored β-glucan paper

This 2020 review subject was yeast cell wall β-glucan effects in humans: “The first aim of this review is to collate and interpret the existing pre‐clinical research on β‐1,3/1,6‐glucan with regard to immunity in order to clarify its molecular mechanism of immunomodulatory action. The second aim of this review is to collate and evaluate the … Continue reading Evaluating a company-sponsored β-glucan paper

Our first 1000 days

This 2021 review subject was a measurable aspect of our early lives: “The first 1000 days from conception are a sensitive period for human development programming. During this period, environmental exposures may result in long-lasting epigenetic imprints that contribute to future developmental trajectories. The present review reports on effects of adverse and protective environmental conditions … Continue reading Our first 1000 days

Rhythmicity

This 2021 review subject was circadian signaling in the digestive system: “The circadian system controls diurnal rhythms in gastrointestinal digestion, absorption, motility, hormones, barrier function, and gut microbiota. The master clock, located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) region of the hypothalamus, is synchronized or entrained by the light–dark cycle and, in turn, synchronizes clocks present … Continue reading Rhythmicity

Eat oats to prevent diabetes

This 2020 rodent study investigated Type 2 diabetics eating oats along with a bad diet: “Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a metabolic disease which is characterized by a state of chronic low-grade inflammation with abnormal expression and production of multiple inflammatory mediators. Insulin resistance (IR), a condition where higher-than-normal concentration of insulin is needed to … Continue reading Eat oats to prevent diabetes

Go with the Alzheimer’s Disease evidence

This 2021 study investigated gut microbiota differences between 100 AD patients and 71 age- and gender-matched controls: “Structural changes in fecal microbiota were evident in Chinese AD patients, with decreased alpha-diversity indices and altered beta-diversity ones, evidence of structurally dysbiotic AD microbiota. Interestingly, traditionally beneficial bacteria, such as Bifidobacterium and Akkermansia, increase in these AD … Continue reading Go with the Alzheimer’s Disease evidence

Eat broccoli sprouts for your kidneys

Starting Year 7 of curating research with a 2021 review of kidney disease and sulforaphane: “Many chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients progress to end-stage kidney disease – the ultimate in failed prevention. While increased oxidative stress is a major molecular underpinning of CKD progression, no treatment modality specifically targeting oxidative stress has been established clinically. … Continue reading Eat broccoli sprouts for your kidneys

Mid-life gut microbiota crisis

This 2019 rodent study investigated diet, stress, and behavioral relationships: “Gut microbiome has emerged as being essential for brain health in ageing. We show that prebiotic supplementation with FOS-Inulin [a complex short- and long-chain prebiotic, oligofructose-enriched inulin] is capable of: Dampening age-associated systemic inflammation; and A profound yet differential alteration of gut microbiota composition in … Continue reading Mid-life gut microbiota crisis

Week 42 of Changing to a youthful phenotype with broccoli sprouts

1. I had two wake-up calls on scale this week. The first started with A follow-on study to 3-day-old broccoli sprouts have the optimal yields that found: “Activity of free MYR [myrosinase enzyme] was the highest at pH 5.0, and it decreased rapidly when pH was less or higher.” Bought a pH meter and ReaLemon … Continue reading Week 42 of Changing to a youthful phenotype with broccoli sprouts

Switch on your Nrf2 signaling pathway

An informative interview to start this year with the author of Sulforaphane: Its “Coming of Age” as a Clinically Relevant Nutraceutical in the Prevention and Treatment of Chronic Disease: The Antioxidant Dilemma with Dr. Christine Houghton “The thing about science is, the more you know, the more you realise you don’t know. And I have … Continue reading Switch on your Nrf2 signaling pathway