Do early experiences of hunger affect our behavior, thoughts, and feelings today?

Reposted from five years ago. A 2015 worldwide human study Hunger promotes acquisition of nonfood objects found that people’s current degree of hungriness affected their propensity to acquire nonfood items. The researchers admitted that they didn’t demonstrate cause and effect with the five experiments they performed, although the findings had merit. News articles poked good-natured … Continue reading Do early experiences of hunger affect our behavior, thoughts, and feelings today?

Fear of feeling?

Here’s a 2018 article from two researchers involved in the Dunedin (New Zealand) Longitudinal Study. They coauthored many studies, including People had the same personalities at age 26 that they had at age 3. The paper’s grand hypothesis was: “A single dimension is able to measure a person’s liability to mental disorder, comorbidity among disorders, … Continue reading Fear of feeling?

What’s a good substitute for feeling loved?

A friend of mine sent a link to this TED talk yesterday. The speaker inspired my friend to change their life along the speaker’s guidelines: “The very act of doing the thing that scared me undid the fear. That feeling, you can’t help but strive for greatness at any cost. The more I work to … Continue reading What’s a good substitute for feeling loved?

Do the impacts of early experiences of hunger affect our behavior, thoughts, and feelings today?

This 2015 worldwide human study Hunger promotes acquisition of nonfood objects found that people’s current degree of hungriness affected their propensity to acquire nonfood items. The researchers admitted that they didn’t demonstrate cause and effect with the five experiments they performed, although the findings had merit. News articles poked good-natured fun at the findings with … Continue reading Do the impacts of early experiences of hunger affect our behavior, thoughts, and feelings today?

If a study didn’t measure feelings, then its findings may not pertain to genuine empathy

This 2014 UK study tried to show that empathetic actions were very context-dependent. It mainly studied causing overt pain to another person. The lead researcher stated: “We were interested in quantifying how much people care about others, relative to themselves. A lack of concern for others’ suffering lies at the heart of many psychiatric disorders … Continue reading If a study didn’t measure feelings, then its findings may not pertain to genuine empathy

Are you feeling kinda blue? Think your brain cells are too few? Get your fat cells on that bike and ride!

This 2014 rodent study found that fat cells released a certain hormone during exercise that produced two beneficial effects: the hormone increased hippocampal neurogenesis; it also reduced depression-like behaviors. So if you’re feeling kinda blue, Think your brain cells are too few? Get your fat cells on that bike and ride! http://www.pnas.org/content/111/44/15810.full “Physical exercise-induced hippocampal … Continue reading Are you feeling kinda blue? Think your brain cells are too few? Get your fat cells on that bike and ride!

Year Two of Changing to a youthful phenotype with sprouts

1. I’ve eaten clinically-relevant doses of sulforaphane every day for 104 weeks now with microwaved 3-day-old broccoli, red cabbage, and mustard sprouts. That’s 8+ times longer than any sulforaphane clinical trial. I continue to: Eat Avena nuda oats for breakfast; Eat 3-day-old hulled Avena sativa oat sprouts twice a day; Eat AGE-less chicken vegetable soup … Continue reading Year Two of Changing to a youthful phenotype with sprouts

Wander into creativity?

This 2019 US study investigated the context of creative ideas: “Creative inspiration routinely occurs during moments of mind wandering. Approximately 20% of ideas occurred in this manner. Although ideas that occurred while participants were both on task and mind wandering did not differ in overall quality, there were several dimensions on which they did consistently … Continue reading Wander into creativity?

Do delusions have therapeutic value?

This 2019 UK review discussed delusions, aka false beliefs about reality: “Delusions are characterized by their behavioral manifestations and defined as irrational beliefs that compromise good functioning. In this overview paper, we ask whether delusions can be adaptive notwithstanding their negative features. We consider different types of delusions and different ways in which they can … Continue reading Do delusions have therapeutic value?

Group statistics don’t necessarily describe an individual

I’m curating this 2018 UC Berkeley/Drexel/Netherlands analysis of human studies via its press coverage. The authors: “Collaborated to analyze data on hundreds of adults – some mentally or physically sound, others suffering from various conditions such as depression, anxiety, or post-traumatic stress disorder. Participants had completed surveys about their mental health and had their heart … Continue reading Group statistics don’t necessarily describe an individual

Ideaesthesia!

This 2018 UK review subject was colored-hearing experiences from music: “Music-colour synaesthesia has a broad scope encompassing not only tone-colour synaesthesia elicited on hearing individual tones, but a complex and idiosyncratic mixture of phenomenological experiences often mediated by timbre, tempo, emotion and differing musical style. Possession of synaesthesia or absolute pitch was shown to have … Continue reading Ideaesthesia!

The epigenetic clock theory of aging

My 400th curation is a 2018 US/UK paper by coauthors of Using an epigenetic clock to distinguish cellular aging from senescence. They reviewed the current state of epigenetic clock research, and proposed a new theory of aging: “The proposed epigenetic clock theory of ageing views biological ageing as an unintended consequence of both developmental programmes … Continue reading The epigenetic clock theory of aging