Burying human transgenerational epigenetic evidence

The poor substitutes for evidence in this 2018 US study guaranteed that human transgenerational epigenetically inherited effects wouldn’t be found in the generations that followed after prenatal diethylstilbestrol (DES) exposure: “A synthetic, nonsteroidal estrogen, DES was administered to pregnant women under the mistaken belief it would reduce pregnancy complications and losses. From the late 1930s … Continue reading Burying human transgenerational epigenetic evidence

The arrogance of a paradigm exceeding its evidence

This 2018 commentary from the American College of Emergency Physicians by 7 physicians discussed the harm that will result from imposing a mandatory paradigm of sepsis treatment. I’ll quote sections that mention evidence: “These metrics [for pneumonia treatment] had little evidentiary basis but led to an institutional-fostered culture of overdiagnosis and overtreatment. Have we learned … Continue reading The arrogance of a paradigm exceeding its evidence

Little evidence for mitochondrial DNA methylation

This 2018 Japanese rodent study used three different techniques to detect mitochondrial DNA methylation: “Whilst 5-methylcytosine (5mC) is a major epigenetic mark in the nuclear DNA in mammals, whether or not mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) receives 5mC modification remains controversial. We used bisulfite sequencing, McrBC digestion analyses and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, which are distinctly differing … Continue reading Little evidence for mitochondrial DNA methylation

Manufacturing PTSD evidence with machine learning

What would you do if you were a scientist who had strong beliefs that weren’t borne out by experimental evidence? Would you be honest with yourself about the roots of the beliefs? Would you attempt to discover why the beliefs were necessary for you, and what feelings were associated with the beliefs? Instead of the … Continue reading Manufacturing PTSD evidence with machine learning

Using citations to develop beliefs instead of evidence

This 2009 Harvard study analyzed how citations were used as tools to establish a belief. The researched data was gathered from 1992 to 2007 on a specific subject of Alzheimer’s research. The belief was: “β amyloid is produced by inclusion body myositis myofibres or is uniquely present in inclusion body myositis muscle.” The author used … Continue reading Using citations to develop beliefs instead of evidence

It is known: Are a study’s agendas more important than its evidence?

This 2015 Swiss human study’s Abstract began: “It is known that increased circulating glucocorticoids in the wake of excessive, chronic, repetitive stress increases anxiety and impairs Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) signaling.” The study had several statements that were unconvincingly supported by the study’s findings. One such statement in the Conclusions section was: “This study supports … Continue reading It is known: Are a study’s agendas more important than its evidence?

Conclusions without evidence regarding emotional memories

The last sentence in the Significance section of this 2015 Emory/Harvard rodent study was: “These data highlight the potential to exploit sensory system plasticity as a means of ameliorating negative emotional memories that may be tied to peripheral sensory systems.” The “ameliorating negative emotional memories” part of this statement was incongruent with what the study … Continue reading Conclusions without evidence regarding emotional memories

A study that provided evidence for basic principles of Primal Therapy

This 2015 Northwestern University rodent study found: “Fear-inducing memories can be state dependent, meaning that they can best be retrieved if the brain states at encoding and retrieval are similar. Memories formed in a particular mood, arousal or drug-induced state can best be retrieved when the brain is back in that state. “It’s difficult for … Continue reading A study that provided evidence for basic principles of Primal Therapy

What scientific evidence can be offered for Primal Therapy’s capability to benefit people’s lives?

Science demands some level of evidence. The usual practice is to develop one or more explanations – hypotheses – of a situation, and experimentally test them. An experiment’s findings are usually presented as evidence that each explanation of the tested situation may be either true or false. The findings often numerically express the probabilities of … Continue reading What scientific evidence can be offered for Primal Therapy’s capability to benefit people’s lives?